PARSA Farm: Our Baby Chicks

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Our baby chicks at PARSA are the cutest! Our entire staff love them, and Sameer from Voice of Afghan Youth even made them their own music video to the Surfin Bird song – our birds are the word! Can’t wait until they grow up and start giving us delicious, fresh organic eggs every morning!

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Working in PARSA’s Gardens

Enjoy these pictures of our women’s agriculture training program at the PARSA gardens in Marastoon. The women – most of whom are from our ambitious group based in Dast-i-Barchi – have been practicing their agricultural skills and have used the land at PARSA to plant tomatoes, eggplants, zucchini and more. They also tend to our orchard of fresh apricot trees. The women get to bring home or sell the majority of their crop, and the Afghan Garden Kitchen purchases some of the fresh produce for use in our popular Friday Brunch in Marastoon. It’s a great program and adds to the wonderful atmosphere at our offices.

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PARSA Farm: Early AM Cow Milking

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SakinaEvery morning Sakina or one of the other women in our PARSA Farm program heads over to our cow pens early in the morning to milk the three milking cows we currently have. The process takes about an hour and results in a bucket of the freshest, most healthy organic milk in the city. We bottle it in 1.5L bottles and sell it for 100 afs (approximately 2 USD) per bottle – cheaper than the UHT filled milk sold in Kabul’s grocery stores. Our 3 cows are currently producing enough milk for about 8-12 bottles daily – and PARSA staff love the creamy, fresh milk so much that we usually buy it all out before it even reaches the bazaar!

Mom cleaning Elvis

Our PARSA Farm is a “Learn and Earn” program that allows women to learn a new valuable skill while earning a small income that comes from the returns of the farm. Our PARSA Farm currently employs 10 women who will take the agriculture skills they are acquiring back to their homes and subsequently start their own small farms in the coming years.

Based on the success of our small farm and the overwhelming demand for fresh milk and milk products, “watani” (Afghan organic) eggs, and fresh vegetables, we are planning to expand our farm into a business that will help sustain PARSA in the future, allowing us to fund some of our own programs and be less reliant on external funding sources. Large scale funding sources in Afghanistan are becoming less reliable as international attention wanes, and our farm is one example of how we are responding to this challenge and working to plan a sustainable future for PARSA and our programs.

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Alyssa Learning

Learning to milk a cow – it’s not as easy as it looks!

PARSA Farm: Our New Baby Cow!!

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Welcome to PARSA, Elvis!!

Our new “chucha gaw” (baby cow) has finally been born. Isn’t he adorable!? These pictures are from the morning after he was born, he is already walking strong. Everyone is very happy to welcome him, and Yasin decided to give him the name Elvis – and he is already stealing our hearts, just like his namesake. Welcome to the family, Elvis!

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Our Friday Brunch crew came to say hi to Elvis – no one could help but smile

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PARSA Farm: Gul Ahmad’s Special Pigeons

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Gul Ahmad Loves his Special Pigeons!!

Gul Ahmad has been a driver at PARSA for 10 years. The joy of his life are his pigeons which he keeps at PARSA in the cow barn. Keeping pigeons in Afghanistan is an ancient tradition. Pigeon keepers usually keep pigeon coops on their roofs, and every night at dusk they let their pigeons out for exercise. The game of pigeons is that the pigeons are taught to swoop into another flock and capture pigeons and bring them back to the home coop.

Check out Reese’s video with a Mexican twist!!

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