Enlightening Visit to a Kabul Girls’ Orphanage

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Even after living in Afghanistan for nearly 2 years there are still eye-openers around every corner. Yesterday I paid my first visit to the Alluaddin Girl’s Orphanage, one of two government funded orphanages in Kabul. The purpose of my visit was to photograph the weekly Girl Scout meeting, but what I came away with was a clearer understanding of the life of a young girl growing up in Afghanistan.

Although I have worked at PARSA for a year and have spent plenty of time around Afghan girls and women, yesterday was a rare opportunity to see a group of girls completely comfortable, in their element, just having fun. I was initially struck by their beauty, openness, cleverness and energy, but then it hit me how normal it all felt. I might as well have been with a group of Girl Scouts back home in Toronto, or anywhere else.

Reading this from anywhere but Afghanistan you would probably say “Of course, children all over the world are the same!”, but here it doesn’t feel like that sometimes, especially with girls. Cultural restrictions don’t allow girls to laugh and play in public, and when they hit puberty many are encouraged to don the burqa and are hidden completely. So seeing a group of young teenage girls laugh and sing and enjoy themselves so immensely was a very rare and rewarding experience.

Leaving the orphanage I felt like I had reconnected with my work at PARSA, and it made me want to redouble my efforts in helping women and girls like the ones at Alluaddin. Because in the back of my head I know that although today they are laughing and carrying on happily, those girls and others like them need as much help as they can to prepare for their futures. The fact is that for a young orphaned woman here in Afghanistan, options for life are bleak at best.  It all reminded me of how important our work here at PARSA is.

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